John Kasich the Governor of Ohio said this week that his presidential aspirations for 2016 depend on if he can raise sufficient money to compete with a number of rivals for the Republican presidential nomination.

Kasich, who is 62, is thinking of running for the nomination, which could make him a potent force in the field, as he is from a big swing state in the election for the White House.

However, with over one dozen Republicans who have already entered the race or about to, Kasich could easily be only one other face on the crowded stage searching for a breakout moment of his own.

Kasich a former Budget Committee Chairman in the House of Representatives was re-elected as the governor of Ohio this past November. He sounded like a candidate for the presidency during a session of 45-minutes with reporters during a lunch on Friday.

Kasich who considered in 2000 to run for the White House before bowing out said he was optimistic he would move forward but did not indicate when he would make his mind up.

I am determining whether I have resources to win and if they are not available, I will not run said Kasich. The Ohio governor, who was a member of Congress for 18 years, touted the experience he has as a big point for why voters in the Republican Party would want him.

A fiscal conservative that has an independent streak, Kasich said he wanted to take the role of being a problem solver. He said the country had its problems and they needed to be solved.

Kasich’s decision to expand Medicaid, a health program funded by the government to help the poor has received criticism from some conservatives.

Many governors in the Republican Party opted not to increase Medicaid opposing the Obamacare law. The White House has said that position deprives residents in those states of dollars from the federal government.

He defended the decision saying the money was being used to treat over 10,000 ill inmates in prisons across Ohio.

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