Rick Perry one of the Republican presidential candidates has stopped paying campaign staffers, a number of media outlets reported, saying the operations of the former of governor of Texas are beginning to run out of money.

Citing campaign as well as officials from a super PAC, a national newspaper said that fundraising for the presidential candidate has dried up.

Perry struggled to gain any traction in this, his second bid, to reach the White House, and has been near the bottom of the 17 GOP members seeking the nomination of his party for the presidential election of 2016.

The campaign manager for Perry last week told Perry staffers following the first debate of the GOP that they would not be paid any longer, but most are attempting to stay on and continue in some capacity as volunteers.

A super PAC that is aligned with the Perry campaign, announced that it would step in and provide support and do work that was normally handled by the campaign, such as building on the ground organizations.

Candidates’ campaigns and super PACs are not allowed legally to coordinate activities, although the groups in fundraising can back candidates.

A senior advisor for the super PAC Opportunity and Freedom said that they would not let Rick Perry down.

Representatives for the campaign of Perry were not available immediately for comment on the apparent financial woes, which emerged first from a national news network.

According to one poll of possible Republican voters, 2.5% said they would vote for the former Texas governor, compared to close to 27% for the leader of the poll Donald Trump.

The poll online surveyed 388 Republicans on August 7. Perry has tangled with Trump as both candidates have thrown verbal barbs at one another during the campaign.

However, Trump was on center stage at the first debate with Perry on the sideline, as he did not make the top 10 in polls to participate.

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