House Republican leaders were able to reach a budget deal with the White House just prior to Monday midnight aimed at averting another government shutdown and debt crisis.

John Boehner the House Speaker made one last appeal to the restive Republicans: Pass this agreement that was hard won with the President prior to Rep. Paul Ryan assuming the job of House Speaker later during the week.

However, he encountered resistance immediately when he laid the plan out on Monday night. The plan is for members to take a vote as of Wednesday.

The budget pact, together with a must pass raise in the federal borrowing limit, would help to solve the toughest of issues awaiting Ryan, who is ready to be elected the speaker Thursday.

The deal also would take showdowns over the budget and government fights over a shutdown off the table until after the presidential election of 2016, a potential boon for candidates from the Republican Party who might have otherwise faced questions about the messes in the Congress, which is Republican controlled.

Congress must increase the borrowing limited for the federal government by November 3 or it will risk a default for the first time ever, while money to make payments for the operations of the government will end on December 11 unless Congress takes action.

This new emerging framework gives both domestic agencies and the Pentagon two years of relief from the Budget of $80 billion in exchange for other cuts taking place elsewhere.

Outlined for the rank and file Republicans during a session on Monday that was closed door, the budget relief totals $50 billion during the first fiscal year and another $30 billion the second year.

The biggest selling point for leaders from the Republicans was that the alternative creates chaos and a debt limit increase that is standalone that could be forced on the Republicans. However, conservatives at the conference, who drover Boehner to his resignation were not ready to toe the line.

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