With only 13 days left until the caucuses in Iowa, Donald Trump and Texas Senator Ted Cruz are sending out different people to the state where the GOP electorate is very conservative and each wants to win very badly.

Trump started his closing arguments in Iowa on Tuesday night when he was given an endorsement by Sarah Palin the former vice presidential nominee from the GOP in 2008.

She built a grass roots support following that year. Palin could be a great deal of help to Trump, especially when it comes to attention from the news media.

However, a great deal of the coverage of her speech giving her endorsement was negative. Reporters and pundits alike noted her rambling, sometimes-rhyming, edgy seeming presentation with Trump standing close by occasionally looking like he hoped she would end her talk.

That might not matter much, since the supporters of Palin do not trust the media.

Cruz’s team was mindful enough of the possible impact of the endorsement that he clarified his spokesperson’s negative comment about the support she was giving Trump.

However, some GOP members see this as a possible advantage for Cruz in the performance that Palin, who just like Trump is a reality television star and has been absent from the political scene for a number of months.

Those Republicans argue Palin and Trump could make Cruz look that much more presidential.

However, if nothing else, 2016 has already been unusual as well as unpredictable.

On the other side, Cruz was denounced by Iowa governor Terry Branstad  and few if any came to his defense when he criticized the subsidies given the renewable fuels industry across Iowa.

The endorsement by Palin has raised the expectations for Trump in the state, as Iowa is a state he can afford to lose, but explaining away a loss is harder if he campaigns harder there.

Trump however is not one who is used to any type of losing and he does not likely want to start now.

Get Analysts' Upgrades and Downgrades Daily - Enter your email address below to receive a concise daily summary of analysts' upgrades, downgrades and new coverage with MarketBeat.com's FREE daily email newsletter.