Hillary Clinton resoundingly won the South Carolina primary to take back the front-runner status in the Democratic race for the presidential nomination with a lopsided win over her opponent Bernie Sanders that worked as a great send off for Super Tuesday.

For Sanders, the nearly 50-point defeat has crystallized the weakness he has with black voters, an important segment of the electorate.

If he loses the black vote by margins similar across the southern states on Tuesday, Clinton likely will take a lead with delegates that will be difficult to overcome.

As Clinton enjoyed her most sweeping win in her political career, she was already focused on next week’s Super Tuesday and on the general election.

She declared that despite what you might hear, it is not necessary to make America great once again, alluding to Donald Trump’s campaign slogan, since American never stopped being great.

Trump, like Clinton, has won three of four early contests. He has cleared out the Republican field to just a few opponents, but continues to be in a bitter contest with Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, two U.S. senators that are scrambling to stop the businessman from running away with their party’s nomination.

The GOP candidates insulted one another on Saturday, with Cruz asking parents if they would be happy with their children speaking profanities in the way the brash Trump does, while Rubio mocked the real estate mogul as a con artist that had the worst sprayed on tan in the U.S.

For Hillary, the win in South Carolina proved to be a way for her to wipe away the bitter memories of her loss eight years ago to Barack Obama. She won with the support of close to 90% of the black voters crucial backer for the Democrats who abandoned her in 2008 for Obama.

Sanders, who was expecting to lose on Saturday, left before the voting had finished and turn to the states outside the South in next Tuesday contests loaded with delegates.

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