Senator Lindsey Graham said he would not make an announcement about his plays until June 1 for the 2016 presidential election, but there is little doubt about what those plans are to be.

He said he was running because he thinks the world is falling apart. I have been right more often than wrong when it comes to foreign policy he said on Monday morning.

Answering the question if he is looking to fill in a gap in the experience of foreign policy amongst contenders for the GOP, the Republican from South Carolina said it was not the fault of others or the lack of this or that which is making him want to run. He said it was his ability to be a good leader, commander in chief and someone who could make Washington work.

Amongst his most important goals if he is elected is increase overall bipartisanship and make the U.S. safer.

He said he has at times been accused of working with the Democrats too often. In his view, the Republicans and Democrats work too little together and he wants to try to change that if he became president.

When it involved radical Islam, he said, he would go for them before they return again to the U.S.

Graham is one of the few possible candidates from the GOP who actually tested the waters since back in January to see if it were right for him to run for the White House.

The Political Action Committee he opened has allowed him to raise money, hire necessary staff and travel to determine if his path is viable to the nomination.

Graham is an outspoken defense hawk in the U.S. Senate. In recent days many of his fellow Republicans have struggled with a question about Iraq,

The question given is what we now know today, would the Iraq invasion have been authorized?

He said he probably would not have done a ground invasion, but would have used another approach toward Saddam. However he said that was yesterday and what is done today and tomorrow as well as the day after is much more important, as Iraq much be reset.

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